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Chinese Immigration Certificates Print Page
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Chinese Immigration Certificates

Legislative controls on Chinese immigration to Canada resulted in a very cumbersome system overseen by the Chief Controller of Chinese Immigration in Ottawa. The system generated a number of certificates, which were issued to Chinese people. These certificates provide very useful genealogical information, and can be a link to Immigration Records.

The C.I.4 was an identifying document, issued to indicate Chinese immigrants at all Customs ports. The form described an individual (with name, photo, physical description, and other data). It also declared an immigrant's intention to remain in Canada, his destination, and whether or not he was liable to pay head tax. C.I.5 certificates were issued based on C.I.4 certificates. The C.I.4 was in use from 1885-1949.


FINDING THE RECORDS

There are no collections of C.I.4 certificates. Individual Chinese immigration case files held by Library and Archives Canada contain some examples. However, access to these files is restricted by law. For more details see the full archival inventory description of the Chinese immigration case files on the Library and Archives Canada website.

The head tax was introduced in 1885, as a means of controlling Chinese immigration. Immigrants paying the head tax were issued with a receipt by immigration officials, also known as a C.I.5 certificate. The C.I.5 certified that the head tax had been paid and the C.I.4 form completed. The form was in use from 1885-1949. At least four slightly different versions were issued.

The C.I.5 certificate initially did not include a photograph. Later, it was felt to be inadequate for identification purposes, and was re-drafted in 1912. When deemed necessary, people with pre-1912 head tax certificates that did not have photographs were issued with a substitute C.I.36 certificate.

Families that have retained copies of head tax certificates issued to their immigrant ancestors will find it a very useful link to Immigration Records.

Front

The following transcription represents information found on head tax certificates, based on a 1919 example:

[Certificate number] C.I.5 Series
Dominion of Canada
Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior
[Name] whose photograph is attached hereto, on the date and at the place hereunder mentioned, the sum of Five Hundred Dollars being the head tax due under the provisions of the Chinese Immigration Act. The above mentioned party who claims to be a native of [City or Village ]in the [District] of [Name] of the age of [number] years who arrived or landed at [port of entry] on the [--] day of [month] 19 [--] on [name of vessel or other conveyance]. The declaration in this case is C.I.4 No. [----].
 
Dated at [port of arrival] on [day and month] 19[--]
  [Signature]
Controller of Chinese Immigration

 

Back

In 1923, after passage of the Chinese Immigration Act, C.I.5 certificates were stamped on the back in accordance with Section 18, which required the registration of all Chinese people living in Canada.


FINDING THE RECORDS

C.I.5 certificates were issued to individuals, and have often remained in the possession of families. Examples may be found in archival repositories.

At Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collections include 18 examples of C.I.5 certificates. Information about all 18 examples is found in LAC's online List of Head Tax Certificates Held at Library and Archives Canada.

The following fourteen C.I.5 certificates have been microfilmed:

Certificate No. Name Date
21942 Set Jeung Jon 1899
23333 Jung Hang 1899
35103 Pan On 1902
39445 Lok King Chun 1903
48837 Jung Gin 1908
62345 Wing Sum 1911
72304 Lau Shong 1912
78146 Chan Ling Gong 1913
78742 Lee Shing Dok 1913
86638 Jung Song Gee 1918
87231 Lee Mee Yew 1914
88103 Jung Bak Hun 1919
[90618] [receipt for certificate of]
Gim Wing Hock
[1952]
91958 Chin Kwock Gong 1922

 

Image copies of the above certificates can be seen on the first part of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-13421, together with examples of other Chinese immigration certificates. Two immigration certificates are available digitally through Library and Archives Canada's Sample Chinese immigration certificates record. One is the C.I.5 certificate for Lee Shing Dok. The other is a C.I.28 certificate.

The following two C.I.5 certificates have not been microfilmed:

Certificate No. Name Date
85422 Kwok Chee Mark 1918
1638 Chong Do Dang 1922

 

Additional information is provided in the archival descriptions of the record collections in which these two head tax certificates are found:

Certificate of payment of head tax (Kwok Chee Mark)

Sam family fonds (Chong Do Dang)

Copies of these two certificates can be ordered from Library and Archives Canada. See How to Access Library and Archives Canada Records for more information.

Related records include:

All of the above records document C.I.5 numbers.

Online

Search for one of the 97,123 Chinese who were recorded in the Chinese Head Tax Register up to 1949 using the Chinese Canadian Stories' Head Tax Database. Search by personal name, village or county of birth, date of registration, port of arrival, vessel name, and more.

The C.I.6 was issued in some circumstances to Chinese persons who had entered Canada prior to 1885 and had therefore paid no head tax. It was in use from 1885 and discontinued after 1912, in favour of a re-drafted C.I.5 or C.I.36.


FINDING THE RECORDS

No collections or examples of C.I.6 certificates have been identified.

Related records include the General Register of Chinese Immigration and the Register of Chinese Immigration - Port of New Westminster, both of which recorded C.I.6 certificate numbers.

The C.I.9 was used from around 1885 to 1953. A person of Chinese ancestry (whether born abroad or native-born) who wished to leave Canada temporarily had to register with immigration authorities. The C.I. 9 (initially called a Certificate of Leave) was issued at the port of departure, and was time-limited. When it was issued, the individual was required to surrender other identifying certificates (e.g. C.I.5, 6, 28, 30, 36). When he re-entered Canada, the C.I.9 certificate was returned to immigration authorities, stamped and filed. Original certificates deposited with immigration authorities at the time of departure were returned to the individual.

The C.I.9 certificate included detailed identifying information, names of friends, photo (at least from 1910), and travel details. Two different versions are known. The following description of personal information found on a C.I.9 certificate is based on a 1917 example:

  • Certificate number
  • Port of departure
    • e.g. Vancouver
  • Destination
    • e.g. Hong Kong
  • Name of ship
    • e.g. Empress of Russia
  • Date of departure
    • e.g. Nov 22 1917
  • Expected port of return
    • Vancouver
  • Proper name
    • e.g. Leung Chik
  • Other names
    • e.g. Leung Chik Lew
  • Month, year and port of arrival in Canada; name of ship
    • e.g. 1907 (Van. Emp Japan) June
  • Current place of residence in Canada
    • e.g. Granum, Alta.
  • First year at current place of residence
    • e.g. 1907
  • Name and number of main identifying document
    • e.g. C.I. 36 No. 06604
  • Occupation
    • e.g.Merchant
  • Place of birth
    • e.g. Bok Gin
  • Age
    • e.g. 30
  • Height
    • e.g. 5 feet 6 inches
  • Facial marks or other peculiarities
    • e.g. Mole and scar between eyebrows, Scar back 1 ear, Mole 1 upperlip

The certificate also includes a declaration by one or more individuals, attesting to the accuracy of the information, as in the following example:

I am personally known to Bew On Hong and Lung Way both of Vancouver to whom I would refer you for correctness of statements herein made.

Following the declaration, the individual signed his name in Chinese characters.

The Controller of Immigration who collected the certificate when the individual returned to Canada also made a declaration that recorded the ship and date on which the person returned, for example:

I have personally examined the person of Chinese origin who claims to be the person above described and whose photograph is affixed hereon (2), who returned to Canada on the name of ship, day and month, 19__ and declare him to be the same person.

Controller's signature
Dated at place, 19__

Related records include:

Lists of Persons Readmitted to Canada at Victoria Under C.I.9 / 9A Certificates and Other Readmissions and Cancellations

Lists of Persons to Whom C.I.9 and C.I.9A Certificates Have Been Issued in Vancouver and Victoria


FINDING THE RECORDS

At the Vancouver Public Library

A set of C.I.9 certificates issued at Vancouver and Victoria has been microfilmed by Library and Archives Canada and is available at the Vancouver Public Library. The microfilms include both the foreign-born and people born in Canada. The films comprise approximately 41,000 certificates. The foreign-born (approximately 35,600) greatly outnumber the Canadian-born (approximately 5600). The certificates are arranged chronologically, as follows:

Victoria - Born abroad (1910-1920)

Film number Certificate numbers Dates
T-6038 15701 - 18099 7 September 1910 -
4 October 1911
T-6039 18100 - 21100 4 October 1911 -
30 October 1912
T-6040 21101 - 23800 30 October 1913 -
20 March 1914
T-6041 23801 - 26500 20 March 1914 -
15 December 1914
T-6042 26501 - 29200 15 December 1914 -
19 October 1915
T-6043 29201 - 31700 19 October 1915 -
30 November 1916
T-6044 31701 - 34400 30 November 1916 -
30 October 1918
T-6045 34401 - 37100 30 October 1918 -
9 April 1920

 

Victoria - Born in Canada (1913-1952)

Film number Certificate numbers Dates
T-6046 1 - 2375 7 May 1913 -
24 July 1952

 

Vancouver - Born abroad (1910-1919)

Film number Certificate numbers Dates
T-6047 17175 - 20110 28 September 1910 -
10 January 1912
T-6048 20111 - 22899 10 January 1911 -
22 October 1913
T-6049 22900 - 25899 22 October 1913 -
12 July 1916
T-6050 25900 - 28649 12 July 1916 -
20 November 1917
T-6051 28650 - 31399 20 November 1917 -
23 July 1919

 

Vancouver - Born in Canada (1915-1939)

Film number Certificate numbers Dates
T-6052 1 - 3240 29 June 1915 -
8 September 1939

 

Some certificates are missing.

For more details, see the archival inventory description of C.I.9 Certificates from Vancouver and Victoria in the General Inventory on the Library and Archives Canada website.

Similar to the C.I.9 certificate, this was issued to crewmen of Chinese ancestry on Canadian and foreign ships docking at Canadian ports. It was used from around 1906 until after 1915.


FINDING THE RECORDS

At Library and Archives Canada

No collections or examples of C.I.9A certificates have been identified. Related records are found in Lists of Persons Readmitted to Canada at Victoria under C.I.9/ 9A Certificates and Other Readmissions and Cancellations.

The C.I.28 certificate was issued to persons who had lost their C.I.5 (head tax) or C.I.36 certificates.

Front

The following represents information found on C.I.28 certificates, based on a 1925 example:

C.I.28 [Number]
Dominion of Canada
Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior
This certifies that

[Name (alternate name)] of [address] whose photograph is hereto attached claims to be [name] who arrived at [port of entry] on the [##] day of [month and year of original arrival] who was registered at Ottawa under [????] at [port of entry] under No. [#####] and to whom C.I.5 No. [#####] was issued.

It is claimed that C.I.5 certificate was lost or destroyed and while this certificate is not an admission that the party to whom it is issued was legally admitted into Canada, it may, unless cancelled upon presentation, be used when registering out under C.I.9.

Chief Controller of Chinese Immigration

 

Back

In 1923, after passage of the Chinese Immigration Act, C.I.28 certificates were stamped on the back in accordance with Section 18, which required the registration of all Chinese people living in Canada.


FINDING THE RECORDS

C.I.28 certificates were issued to individuals and have often remained in the possession of families. Examples may be found in archival repositories.

At Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collections include four examples of C.I.28 certificates:

Certificate No. Name Alternate Name Date
06561 John Chew Hong Yeu Chew Fun 1915
07326 Chong Lee Quon Dock Fon 1916
12189 Long Yee Long Wing Chong 1924
12314 Chong Tung Chong Jun Den 1925

 

Additional information about these certificates is found in Library and Archives Canada's online List of Head Tax Certificates Held at Library and Archives Canada.

Image copies of the certificates can be seen on the first part of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-13421, together with examples of other Chinese immigration certificates. Two immigration certificates are available digitally through Library and Archives Canada's Sample Chinese immigration certificates record. One is the C.I.28 certificate for Chong Lee. The other is a C.I.5 certificate (Head Tax).

Related records are found in the C.I.28 Register, which records the numbers of C.I.28 certificates issued to approximately 14,300 individuals between 1912-1950.

The C.I.30 certificate was issued instead of a C.I.5 (head tax) certificate to persons entering Canada who were exempt from paying the head tax. The category included people such as merchants, diplomats and teachers. The form was in use from before 1921 to 1949.

Front

The following represents information found on C.I.30 certificates, based on a 1921 example:

[Certificate number] C.I. 30
Dominion of Canada
Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior

This certifies that [name] whose photograph is attached hereto arrived or landed at [name of port] on the [#] day of [month] 19[##] ex. [name of ship] and upon the representations made has been admitted as exempt from head tax under the provisions of the Chinese Immigration Act.

The above-mentioned party claimed to be a native of [village or town] in the district of [name] of the age of [##] years. The declaration in this case is C.I.4 No. [#####].

Dated at [port of entry] on [month and day] 19[##].

Controller of Chinese Immigration

 

Back

In 1923, after passage of the Chinese Immigration Act, C.I. 30 certificates were stamped on the back in accordance with Section 18, which required the registration of all Chinese people living in Canada.

If the individual to whom the C.I.30 certificate was issued subsequently ceased to belong to an exempt class and therefore became subject to the head tax, this was also recorded on the reverse of the C.I.30 certificate.


FINDING THE RECORDS

At Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collections include the following example of a C.I. 30 certificate:

*The file also includes a related 1924 head tax receipt, issued after Lum Po lost the status under which he was exempted in 1921.Additional information about these certificates is found in Library and Archives Canada's online List of Head Tax Certificates Held at Library and Archives Canada.An image copy of the certificate can be seen on the first part of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-13421, together with examples of other Chinese immigration certificates.Related records include the Victoria Ledger of Exempt Admissions and the Vancouver Ledger of Exempt Admissions, both of which documented C.I.30 certificate numbers.

Certificate No. Name Date
02066 Lum Po 1921*

C.I.36 certificates were issued to replace C.I.5 (head tax) certificates issued prior to 1912. The older certificates were considered inadequate, as they did not include photographs. Replacements were issued as the occasion arose - for example, when someone needed a travel document.

Front

The following represents information found on C.I.36 certificates, based on a 1913 example:

[Certificate number] C.I.36
Dominion of Canada
Immigration Branch - Department of the Interior
Ottawa December 22nd 1913
This certifies that [Name (alternate name)] of [address] whose photograph is hereto attached claims to be [name] who arrived at [port of entry] on the [##] day of [month and year of original arrival] who was registered at Ottawa under [????] at [port of entry] under No. [#####] and to whom C.I.5 No. [#####] was issued.
 
This certificate is given in exchange for C.I.5 above mentioned and while it is not an admission that the party to whom it is issued was legally admitted into Canada, it may, unless cancelled upon presentation, be used when registering out under C.I.9.
 
Chief Controller of Chinese Immigration

 

Back

In 1923, after passage of the Chinese Immigration Act, C.I.36 certificates were stamped on the back in accordance with Section 18, which required the registration of all Chinese people living in Canada.


FINDING THE RECORDS

C.I.36 certificates were issued to individuals and have often remained in the possession of families. Examples may be found in archival repositories.

At Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collections include five examples of C.I.36 certificates:

Certificate No. Name Alternate Name Date
02955 Fung Tak Ming -- 1913
06596 Ung Dip Jang -- 1914
20880 Seid Yew Seid Dong 1924
21217 Chin Ming Kee Ching Ming Gee 1924
23563* Lee Sha Yue Wing Too 1924

 

*This is not a C.I.36 certificate, but a 1953 receipt for a C.I.36 certificate, together with a 1946 C.I.46 certificate for the same person.

Additional information about these certificates is found in Library and Archives Canada's online List of Head Tax Certificates Held at Library and Archives Canada.

Image copies of the certificates can be seen on the first part of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-13421, together with examples of other Chinese immigration certificates.

Related records are found in the C.I.36 register, which records the numbers of C.I.36 certificates issued to approximately 24,200 individuals, most of whom arrived in Canada between 1895-1912.

The C.I.44 was issued to certify that an individual had registered under Section 18 of the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923. Registration was required of every person of Chinese origin in Canada. The certificate recorded detailed identifying information, and bore a photo and related file numbers. The number and date of the C.I.44 was also stamped on the back of the individual's main identifying document (C.I.5, 6, 28, 30 or 36). The C.I.44 was in use from about June 1923 to July 1924.


FINDING THE RECORDS

No collections or examples of C.I.44 certificates have been identified. Citizenship and Immigration Canada may be able to provide information.

The C.I.45 was a card issued as proof of registration under the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923 to those who did not have a main identifying document that could be stamped, such as a C.I.5, 6, 28, 30 or 36. This included persons who were born in Canada, and those who had lost their original documents. The C.I.45 was in use from about June 1923 to July 1924.


FINDING THE RECORDS

No collections or examples of C.I.45 certificates have been identified.

The C.I.46 was an identity card issued to crew members of Chinese origin employed on ships travelling between Canadian and U.S. ports. These crew members were required to register with immigration officials. The C.I.46 certificate allowed them to leave and re-enter Canada during a limited period of time [e.g. one year].

Front

The following represents information found on C.I.46 certificates, based on a 1947 example:

C.I. 36
Dominion of Canada
Department of Immigration and Colonization
Chinese Immigration Branch
Serial no. [###]
This is to certify that [name sometimes known as alternate name] whose photograph and description appear on the back hereof, has registered with the Controller of Chinese Immigration at the Port of [name] in accordance with the provisions of Section 25 of the Chinese Immigration Act, 1923, he being a member of the crew of the S.S. [name of ship] operating between Canadian and United States ports.
 
This is only valid whilst the said [name of person] is a member of the crew of the S.S. [name of ship] and becomes null and void after [month and day] 19[##] on which date the registration period of [#] year[s] expires.
 
Dated at [place of registration] this [day] of [month], 19[##].
 
Controller of Chinese Immigration

 


FINDING THE RECORDS

At Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) collections include two examples of C.I. 46 certificates:

Certificate No. Name Alternate Name Date
262 Lee Sha Yue Wing Too 1947
393 Won Ken ___ 1945

 

Additional information about these records is found in Library and Archives Canada's online List of Head Tax Certificates Held at Library and Archives Canada.

Image copies of the certificates can be seen on the first part of Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-13421, together with examples of other Chinese immigration certificates.

In addition to the C.I.4, 5, 6, 9, 9A, 28, 30, 36, 44, 45 and 46, a number of other Chinese immigration forms were used between 1885-1953. Not all related to individuals; some were used for other administrative purposes relating to Chinese immigration.

The following is a provisional list of other forms used. It is derived from a list prepared by Library and Archives Canada in 1987.

Form Number Title of Description Dates in Use Purpose and Contents
C.I. Certificates
C.I.1 "Special Reports Required by Law to be Made by the Master of Any Vessel Bringing Chinese Immigrants to Canada" Before 1911 - after 1911 The Chinese Immigration Act of 1885 (c.71 s.6) required the master of a ship to list the names and birthplaces of crew members, and the names, birthplaces, occupations, and last places of domicile of Chinese passengers.
C.I.2 "Bill of Health" Before 1911 - after 1911 This certified good health on vessels bringing Chnese passengers into port. The certification was made by port quarantine officers.
C.I.3 "Controller's Warrant for the Landing of Chnese Immigrants" Before 1911 - after 1911 This authorized a ship master to land Chinese immigrants.
C.I.7 Unknown ? - Before 1911 Unknown
C.I.8 "Report of Transactions Under the Chinese Immigration Act" Before 1910 - after 1947 This was a monthly report of certificates issued and other transactions carried out under the Chinese Immigration Act. It was forwarded by the Collectors of Customs who handled Chinese immigration cases.
C.I.9 (Nfld.) Out-registration certificate 1906-1950 This form was used to document individuals leaving Newfoundland temporarily. It was similar to the C.I.9 issued by Canadian immigration authorities. There are no known examples. Out-registrations were recorded in ledger in called the Newfoundland Register of Arrivals and Outward Registrations.
C.I.10 "Certificate Issued by the Government of the Dominion of Canada to [name], a Chinese Person About to Go to the United States" Before 1911 - after 1911 The C.I.10 was issued to Chinese persons wishing to visit the U.S. and return to Canada. Usually these persons were exempt from head tax. C.I.10s were issued only at Vancouver, Victoria and Ottawa. They recorded detailed identifying information for each individual.
C.I.11 "Report of Chinese and Other Passengers Landed From or Reported at the Port of [name]" Before 1911 - after 1911 This was a statistical report of numbers of Chinese persons landed from steampships, according to class (e.g. exempt, head tax payers, C.I.9 returnees, etc.)
C.I.12 Unknown Ceased before 1911 Unknown
C.I.13 Unknown Ceased before 1911 Unknown
C.I.14 Unknown Ceased before 1911 Unknown
C.I.15 C.I.5 register Before 1911 - after 1911 These were large registers of C.I.5 forms received and issued.
C.I.16 "Requisition for Chinese Certificates" In or before 1910 - after 1910 This form was used to request blank C.I.5 certificate forms to be used for specific ship arrivals. The C.I.16 was used only at Vancouver and Victoria.
C.I.17 Untitled In or before 1910 - after 1910 This was a "Confidential" form, used to record the results of an examination of a person claiming to be a merchant or other person exempt from paying head tax.
C.I.18 "Form for Son's Examination" Around 1910 - in order after 1921 This was a "Confidential" form, used to record the results of an examination of a person claiming to be the son of a merchant or other person exempt from paying head tax. Various versions were used.
C.I.18 "Form for Father's Examination" Around 1910 - in order after 1921 This was a "Confidential" form, used to record the results of an examination of a person claiming to be the parent of a merchant or other person exempt from paying head tax. Various versions were used.
C.I.19 Unknown Ceased before 1911 Unknown
C.I.20 File jacket In or after 1893 - 1911 This was a file jacket or folder for the Chinese Immigration Service, issued by the Department of Trade and Commerce.
C.I.21 Release certificate In or before 1910 - after 1910 This certificate released a Chinese person who had been detained and whose right to enter Canada had been established.
C.I.22 "Report of Chinese Outwards" In or before 1910 - after 1911 A list of Chnese persons leaving Canada by ship who had passed across Canada in transit to and from foreign countries. It was submitted by the ship's master.
C.I.23 "Special Chinese Manifest" Unknown This form listed Chinese persons travelling across Canada by train, in transit to another country. It was issued in accordance with R.S.C. 1906, c.95, s.7 and Chinese Immigration regulations.
C.I.24 "Records of Chinese Exempts" Before 1910 - after 1910 This was a monthly report submitted by ports of entry which tabulated the numbers of different classes of exempt persons and overstays.
C.I.25 Temporary head tax receipt Unknown A temporary receipt for payment of head tax. It was cancelled when the C.I.5 was issued.
C.I.26 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.27 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.29 Untitled affadavit for application to replace lost C.I.5 Around 1912 to around 1947 (?) This affadavit provided detailed identifying information, as well as a photograph and references. It was used to support applications for C.I.28s, which replaced lost C.I.5s.
C.I.31 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.32 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.33 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.34 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.35 Untitled application form for a C.I.36 certificate Before 1916-after 1916 This form was used to apply for a C.I.36 certificate, which was a substitute for C.I.5 certificates issued without photos.
C.I.37 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.38 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.39 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.40 "Investigation Made Into the Standing as a Chinese Merchant of [name]" Around 1911 - after 1914 This form was used to document the investigation of persons claiming exemption from paying head tax based on the fact that they were a merchant. The form recorded names of partners, amounts invested, location and description of business premises, turnover, and merchandise.
C.I.41 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.43 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.47 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.48 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.49 Unknown Unknown Unknown
C.I.50 Untitled certificate issued to temporary Chinese visitors After 1912 - around 1947 This was issued to Chinese temporarily admitted to Canada by Minister's permit under the Chinese Immigration Act of 1923, s.9. Those admitted included diplomats, merchants, servants, entertainers, doctors, teachers, scholars, clergymen, students and tourists. Two versions were used.
Immigration Forms
IMM. 30 -- Around 1947 - around 1951 This form documented the entry of a Chinese person to Canada. It was placed in the individual's case file at Immigration headquarters.
IMM. 55B "Application fo the Admission of Nominated Immigrants"[Chinese version] Before 1961 - after 1963 This was a special Chinese version of an application form for the admission of sponsored relatives. The form included detailed identifying and genealogical information.
IMM.637 "Statutory Declaration" (Chinese Adjustment Statement) (a) November 1962 - October 1964
(b) October 1964 - after 1965
This was a declaration of true family composition and identifying information. It was used by persons applying for status adjustment under the Chinese program. There were two versions.
IMM.638 "Extract of Statement Made by the Honourable Richard Bell, Minister of Citizenship and Immigration in the House of Commons on November 16, 1962" November 1962 The statement described revised status adjustment procedures, and was to be read and signed by applications. There were both Chinese and English versions on the sheet.
IMM.692 "Chinese Family Tree" 1964-around 1972 This was a blank genealogical form used to record "tree" and "paper" names and family relationships in cases under investigation, for the purpose of indexing.
Miscellaneous Forms
NF.63 Untitled Newfoundland Chinese immigration certificate 1910-1930; 1949 This certificate was probably similar to the Canadian C.I.5 certificate. It was issued to Chinese persons admitted to Newfoundland under it's Chinese Immigration Act of 1906. Certificate numbers are recorded in Newfoundland Register of Arrivals and Outward Registrations.

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